8 Ahaw 13 Mol (August 31, 2022)

 

8 Ajaw 13 Mol: Drawing by Jorge Pérez de Lara

8 Ajaw 13 Mol (August 31, 2022)

Jun B’atz’ and Jun Chowen return to Santa Lucía Utatlán:
Congratulations to Our Next 2022 Mini-grant Recipients!

Promotional Poster for the Workshop in Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala

As the summer draws to a close I’m reflecting on how many of us, myself included, are finally returning to teaching again in person for the first time in over two and a half years. I have profoundly missed being in the classroom and seeing my students, and it feels so good to be back! I know the same is true for many of our colleagues who are once again teaching in the classroom.

We are very excited to be receiving our very first reports back from our recently awarded mini-grant recipients, such as this month’s report from Marta Dominga Cux Yac from Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala. Together with Wilmer Aram Aju, Marta organized and facilitated an introductory workshop for K’iche’ students, within which they utilized various sources, including images from the Mayavase database (www.mayadatabase.com), the Wayeb workbook, and a wonderful comic book version of the Popol Wuj.

I had not seen the delightful comic book version of the Popol Wuj by Mélanie Forné. Here is a link to some of the beautiful illustrations:

Forné, Mélanie. Popol Wuj: Creación del mundo y los primeros hombres. Guatemala: Prensa Libre, 2015.

https://melanieforne.com/portfolio/illustration-autour-des-mayas/#jp-carousel-163

We look forward to hearing back from more of our colleagues and publishing more reports in the upcoming months!

We are still receiving additional applications, and after announcing our first sixteen grantees last month, we are proud to announce the following additional five grantees from different Mayan languages in Guatemala and Mexico:

Avenamar López Gómez
Ignacio Allende, Las Margaritas, Chiapas: Tojolabal

Bety, María Bertha Sántiz Pérez
Las Margaritas, Chiapas, Mexico: Tojolabal

Hermelinda Gómez López
Francisco I. Madero, Las Margaritas, Chiapas: Tojolabal

Iván Jimenez Balan
Maní, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Mario Caal Jucub and Marina Rosales López
Cahabon, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala: K’iche

Romelia Mó Isém and Sak Chuwen
Palin, Escuintla, Guatemala: Poqomam

Through donated funds designated for the publication of online presentations, we were very happy to be able to contribute to the conference, “3000 years of Mayan writing, the development of writing from the preclassic to today,” which recently took place in Palin, Escuintla, Guatemala, during August 1-6, 2022.

This conference was a team effort, organized by the team from the Sak Chuwen Center for Research and Studies of Maya Epigraphy (cieemaya@gmail.com), with Iyaxel Cojti, Magdalena Pérez Conguache, Walter Paz Joj, Leonardo García and Romelia Mó Isém. This team worked together with the Department of Anthropology of the Americas of the Institute of Archeology and Anthropology at the University of Bonn, with Nikolai Grube and Alejandro Garay, co-facilitating the workshops. Co-sponsors of this event also included La Oficina de Pueblos Indígenas de la Municipalidad de Palin, Escuintla, La Comunidad Lingüística Poqomam, and the Asociación Cultural Poqomam Qawinaqel.

We are looking forward to publishing the videos from this conference in the near future!

Congratulations to all of our recipients, and once again, a hearty thanks to our supporters for your generous donations! Stay tuned for more reports to come!

Sincerely,

Michael Grofe, President
MAM


Introduction to the Maya Writing System:
Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala

Marta Dominga Cux Yac: Organizer
Wilmer Aram Aju: Facilitator

1. General data of the activity
Development of workshops on the Mayan writing system as an introduction to Maya epigraphy for young people from the municipality of Santa Lucía Utatlán, in Sololá.

2. Objective and scope of the activity
Contribute to the learning and revitalization of writing as ancestral knowledge in the K’iche’ Maya region of western Guatemala. Young people of different ages are trained to enrich their knowledge through this writing.

3. Analytical Memorandum

In the development of the workshops in the municipality of Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala, demands for participation became visible, so workshops were proposed at three times on the dates of August 12, 15 and 17, 2022. Participants of different ages came from different communities, and some came from another department. This cooperation was an achievement, since a lot was learned in these workshop classes. At the same time, there was satisfaction as the participants requested more workshops, such as the follow-up of what was learned in an intermediate class.

Students are shown an image of scribes from Maya vase K1185

The following information was covered in the workshop:

A. Aj Tz’iib’
As found in the codices, the essence of aj tz’iib’ was revealed. The aj tz’iib’ as it is said, actually describes the person who writes, the writer or the scribe and that formerly was the person who dedicated himself to the reproduction of the tz’iib’ system on different types of materials and techniques. In ancient times the scribe could also take a specific name of aj uxul “the carver”, aj b’ik’il “engraver”, aj wohol “he of the signs.”

B. Jun B’atz’ and Jun Chowen
A reference is found in the Popol Wuj, in the K’iche’ language, about the “artistic abilities” that the Mayan scribes/painters had when they describe the characteristics of the brothers Jun B’atz’ and Jun Chowen (calendrical names meaning One Monkey, One Monkey), who are considered mothers and fathers of art and of the word:

https://melanieforne.com/portfolio/illustration-autour-des-mayas/#jp-carousel-166

C. Use of the Syllabary
Syllabogram: also called phonograms, they are signs that represent meaningless sounds, such as vowels (v), consonants (c) and syllables (cv, vc, or cvc), which are therefore called “syllabograms.” (EDUCALINGO, Syllabogram).

A syllable is a minimum unit of organization in a sequence of sounds (Kettunen and Helmke, 2020:8).

Learning about the Maya Writing System

D. Auxiliary/diacritic signs
Like semantic determiners, auxiliary signs are signs that lack reading value. They serve to help the process of writing or reading other signs. In Mayan writing, a diacritic has been identified as the so-called duplicator.

E. Structure of a Word
Glyphic block: group of signs organized in a “quadrangular” space. The signs that occupy more space are called main signs; those who They occupy less space (normally half of a main sign) and are called affixes (prefixes, suprafixes, subfixes, postfixes or infixes).

Students learn to identify logograms

Students learn to identify logograms

F. Structure of the Text

Students work learn to spell their names

G. Structure of a word
Final vowel omission: in the Mayan languages ​​the vast majority of words end in a consonant (-C), but their syllabograms ended in a vowel (CV), the scribes determined, by convention, that the vowel of the phonetic complement or of the last syllabic link should be ignored during reading.

Students show their work after writing their names

This learning process contributes to building a change in which ancestral knowledge about the study of Mayan hieroglyphic writing can be rescued. In the territory it is a new system that is being implemented thanks to the contribution of Maya Antiguo para los Mayas (MAM).

It is a change that has occurred for these generations, in which some of them have been surprised by the writing and commit to continue practicing with the materials provided.

References

EDUCALINGO. Syllabogram [online dictionary].
Available at https://educalingo.com/en/dic-en/syllabogram (accessed
31 August 2022).

Kettunen, Harri, and Christophe Helmke. Introduction to Maya Hieroglyphs (Wayeb) or https://www.mesoweb.com/resources/handbook/IMH2020.pdf (Mesoweb). English version. Workshop Handbook, Seventeenth Edition, 2020 (accessed 31 August 2022).

Wikipedia contributors. “Maya script.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 30 Aug. 2022 (accessed 31 August 2022)

Marta Dominga Cux Yac, Organizer
Wilmer Aram Aju, Facilitator
Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala, C.A.

8 Ahaw 13 Mol (31 augusto de 2022)

8 Ajaw 13 Mol: dibujo de Jorge Pérez de Lara.

8 Ajaw 13 Mol (31 de agosto de 2022)

Jun B’atz’ y Jun Chowen regresan a Santa Lucía Utatlán:
¡Felicitaciones a nuestros próximos beneficiarios de mini-becas de 2022!

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Downloads:Workehop_Wilmer_Aram_Aju'.png

Afiche Promocional del Taller en Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala

A medida que el verano llega a su fin, estoy reflexionando sobre cuántos de nosotros, incluido yo mismo, finalmente regresamos a la enseñanza en presencial por primera vez en más de dos años y medio. He extrañado profundamente estar en el salón de clases y ver a mis alumnos, ¡y se siente tan bien estar de regreso! Sé que lo mismo es cierto para muchos de nuestros colegas que una vez más están enseñando en el aula.

Estamos muy emocionados de recibir nuestros primeros informes de nuestros beneficiarios de mini-becas recientemente otorgados, como el informe de este mes de Marta Dominga Cux Yac de Santa Lucía Utatlán, Guatemala. Junto con Wilmer Aram Aju, Marta facilitó un taller introductorio para estudiantes de K’iche’, dentro del cual utilizaron varias fuentes, incluidas imágenes de la base de datos de Mayavase, el libro de trabajo de Wayeb y una maravillosa versión de cómic del Popol Wuj:

No había visto la encantadora versión de cómic del Popol Wuj de Mélanie Forné, y aquí hay un enlace a algunas de las hermosas ilustraciones:

Forné, Mélanie. Popol Wuj: Creación del mundo y los primeros hombres. Guatemala: Prensa Libre (2015).

https://melanieforne.com/portfolio/illustration-autour-des-mayas/#jp-carousel-163

Todavía estamos recibiendo solicitudes adicionales, y después de anunciar nuestros primeros dieciséis beneficiarios el mes pasado, nos enorgullece anunciar los siguientes cinco beneficiarios adicionales de diferentes idiomas mayas en Guatemala y México:

Avenamar López Gómez
Ignacio Allende, Las Margaritas, Chiapas: Tojolabal

Bety, María Bertha Sántiz Pérez
Las Margaritas, Chiapas, Mexico: Tojolabal

Hermelinda Gómez López
Francisco I. Madero, Las Margaritas, Chiapas: Tojolabal

Iván Jimenez Balan
Maní, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Mario Caal Jucub and Marina Rosales López
Cahabon, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala: K’iche’

Romelia Mó Isém and Sak Chuwen
Palin, Escuintla, Guatemala: Poqomam

A través de fondos donados destinados a la publicación de presentaciones en línea, nos sentimos muy felices de poder contribuir a la conferencia “3000 años de escritura maya, el desarrollo de la escritura desde el preclásico hasta hoy,” que se llevó a cabo recientemente en Palin, Escuintla, Guatemala, del 1 al 6 de agosto.

Esta conferencia fue un trabajo en equipo, organizado por el equipo del Centro de Investigación y Estudios de Epigrafía Maya Sak Chuwen, con Iyaxel Cojti, Magdalena Pérez Conguache, Walter Paz Joj, Leonardo García y Romelia Mó Isém. Este equipo trabajó en conjunto con el Departamento de Antropología de las Américas del Instituto de Arqueología y Antropología de la Universidad de Bonn, con Nikolai Grube y Alejandro Garay como co-facilitadores de los talleres. Los copatrocinadores de este evento también incluyeron a La Oficina de Pueblos Indígenas de la Municipalidad de Palin, Escuintla, La Comunidad Lingüística Poqomam y la Asociación Cultural Poqomam Qawinaqel.

¡Esperamos publicar los videos de esta conferencia en un futuro cercano!

¡Felicitaciones a todos nuestros destinatarios y, una vez más, un sincero agradecimiento a nuestros seguidores por sus generosas donaciones! ¡Estén atentos para más informes por venir!

Atentamente,

Michael J. Grofe, Presidente
MAM

Introducción al Sistema de Escritura Maya:
Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala

Responsible: Marta Dominga Cux Yac
Falicitado por: Wilmer Aram Aju

1. Datos generales de la actividad
Desarrollo de talleres sobre el sistema de escritura maya como introducción a la epigrafía maya a jóvenes del municipio de Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá.

2. Objetivo y alcance de la actividad
Contribuir al aprendizaje y rescate de la escritura como conocimiento ancestral en la regiónmaya Kiches del occidente de Guatemala. Las cuales se forman jóvenes de diferentes edades para un enriquecer los conocimientos a través de esta escritura.

3. Memoria analítica
En los logros alcanzados en el desarrollo de los talleres en el municipio de Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala. Se visibilizo números demandas de participación por lo que se plantearon talleres en tres momentos en las fechas del 12, 15 y 17 de agosto de 2022, las cuales los y las participantes son de diferentes edades y procedentes de diferentes comunidades, por lo que también llegaron de otro departamento, es un logro alcanzado ya que en los procesos del taller se aprendió mucho. Al mismo tiempo se tuvo la satisfacción ya que los participantes solicitaron más talleres tal como el seguimiento de lo aprendido o procesos de intermedio. Dentro del desarrollo de la temática también se desarrollaron temas relacionadas al proceso formativo.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Screen Shot 2022-08-31 at 12.00.24 AM.png

Los estudiantes se les muestra una imagen de escribas de la vasija maya K1185

En el taller se cubrió la siguiente información:

A. Aj Tz’iib’

Se dio a conocer la esencia de aj tz’iib’ que se encuentra en los códices. El aj tz’iib’como se dice actualmente a la persona que escribe, escritor o escriba y que antiguamente era la persona que se dedicaba a la reproducción del sistema tz’iib’ sobre diferentes tipos de materiales y técnicas; y que en la antigüedad podía tomar también un nombre específico aj uxul “el tallador”, aj b’ik’il “grabador”, aj wohol “el de los signos.”

B. Jun B’atz’ and Jun Chowen

Una referencia que se encuentra en el Popol Wuj, en idioma K’iche’, sobre las “habilidades artísticas” que tenían los escribas/pintores mayas, es cuando describen las características de los hermanos Jun B’atz’ y Jun Chowen (nombres calendáricos que significa Uno Mono, Uno Mono) considerados madres y padres del arte y de la palabra:

https://melanieforne.com/portfolio/illustration-autour-des-mayas/#jp-carousel-166

C. Uso del Silabario
Silabograma: también llamados fonogramas, son signos que representan sonidos sin significado, como pueden ser vocales (v), consonantes (c) y sílabas (cv, vc, o cvc), que por lo mismo se llaman silabogramas (EDUCALINGO, Syllabogram).

Una sílaba es una unidad mínima de organización en una secuencia de sonidos (Kettunen y Helkme. 2011:8).

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Screen Shot 2022-08-31 at 12.00.37 AM.png

Aprendiendo sobre el Sistema de Escritura Maya

D. Signos auxiliares/diacrítico
Como los determinativos semánticos, los signos auxiliares son signos que carecen de valor de lectura. Sirven para ayudar al proceso de la escritura o lectura de otros signos. En la escritura maya se ha identificado un diacrítico, el llamado duplicador.

E. Estructura de una Palabra
Bloque glífico: grupo de signos organizados en un espacio “cuadrangular (Lacadena. 2010). Los signos que ocupan mayor espacio son llamados signos principales; los que

Ocupan menos espacio (normalmente la mitad de un signo principal) son llamados afijos (prefijos, suprafijos, subfijos, posfijos o infijos).

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Screen Shot 2022-08-31 at 12.00.47 AM.png

Los estudiantes aprenden a identificar logogramas

F. Estructura de Texto

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Screen Shot 2022-08-31 at 12.01.03 AM.png

Los estudiantes trabajan para aprender a deletrear sus nombres

G. Estructura de una palabra
Omisión vocal final: en los idiomas mayances la inmensa mayoría de las palabras terminan en consonante (-C), pero sus silabogramas acababan en vocal (CV), los escribas determinaron, por convención, que la vocal del complemento fonético o del último enlace silábico debía ignorarse durante la lectura, ejemplos:

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Screen Shot 2022-08-31 at 12.00.13 AM.png Los estudiantes muestran su trabajo después de escribir sus nombres

Este proceso de aprendizaje contribuye a construir un cambio en la cual se pueda rescatar los conocimientos ancestrales sobre el estudio de la escritura jeroglífica maya. En el territorio es un nuevo sistema que se está implementando gracias al aporte de Maya Antiguo para los Mayas (MAM).

Es un cambio que se ha dado para estas generaciones, en la cual alguno de ellos se ha sorprendido sobre la escritura y se comprometen en seguir practicando con los materiales proporcionados.

Referencias

EDUCALINGO. Syllabogram [diccionario en línea].
Disponible en: https://educalingo.com/en/dic-en/syllabogram (descargado 31 de augusto de 2022).

Kettunen, Harri, y Christophe Helmke.  Introducción a los Jeroglíficos Mayas (Wayeb) o https://www.mesoweb.com/resources/handbook/JM2011 (Mesoweb). Versión en español. Manual para el Taller de Escritura, Cuarta Edición, 2011 (descargado 31 de augusto de 2022).

Colaboradores de Wikipedia, ‘Escritura maya’, Wikipedia, La enciclopedia libre, 25 agosto de 2022. (descargado 31 de augusto de 2022).

Marta Dominga Cux Yac, Organizer
Wilmer Aram Aju, Facilitator

Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala, C.A.

Publicado en New

7 Ahaw 13 Xul (July 22, 2022)

7 Ajaw 13 Xul (July 22, 2022)

The Maya Hieroglyphic Renaissance Continues: Congratulations to our 2022 mini-grant recipients!

We are very excited to report the first sixteen recipients of this year’s mini-grants. It has been over two years since we have had the opportunity to award mini-grants for in-person instruction due to the pandemic, and we are grateful that the time has finally come to return safely to the classroom to revive the teaching of the ancient Maya script.

We have some additional applications in process, and we are also continuing to accept applications for more mini-grants as needed, so please continue to apply!

We are proud to have been able to award mini-grants to the following sixteen Maya colleagues, speaking nine different Mayan languages in Guatemala and Mexico:

Ajpub’ Pablo García Ixmatá
Chicacao, Suchitepéquez, Guatemala: Tzutujil

Crisanto Kumul
Sisbichen, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Edy Benjamín López Castillo
Jacaltenango, Huehuetenango, Guatemala: Popti’

Gloria Nayeli Tun Tuz
Dzitox, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Gregorio Hau Caamal
Sinanche, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Julio César López
Oxchuc, Chiapas, Mexico: Tzeltal

Laysha Yanara Jimenez Uicab
Margarita Maza de Juárez,
Quintana Roo, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Leonel Pacay Rax
Cobán, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala: Q’eqchi

Marta Dominga Cux Yac
Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala: K’iche’

Martin Gómez Ramirez
Abasolo, Ocosingo, Chiapas, Mexico: Tzeltal

Mateo Ajualip Rodriguez
Cubulco, Baja Verapaz, Guatemala: Achí

Milner Rolando Pacab Alcocer
Yaxcabá, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Omar Chan May
Felipe Carillo Puerto, Quintana Roo, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Pedro Geovi Toledo and Gaspar Pedro Nicolas
San Miguel Acatán, Huehuetenango, Guatemala: Akateko

Victor Manuel Mazun Tec
Yaxunah, Yucatán, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Waykan Gonzalo Benito Pérez
Palin, Escuintla, Guatemala: Poqomam

Congratulations to all of these recipients, and thanks to all of you who make these workshops possible through your generous donations! We are so grateful to be able to resume working with Maya communities to help them preserve their languages and cultures, and to take an interest in the writing of the Ancient Maya.

We look forward to hearing about these upcoming workshops and publishing their reports back from the field in the near future!

Sincerely,

Michael Grofe, President
MAM

Publicado en New

7 Ahaw 13 Xul (22 de julio de 2022)

7 Ahaw 13 Xul (22 de julio de 2022)

El Renacimiento de los Jeroglíficos Mayas Continúa: ¡Felicitaciones a Nuestros Últimos Beneficiarios de Mini-becas 2022!

Estamos muy emocionados de informar los primeros dieciséis beneficiarios de las mini-becas de este año. Han pasado más de dos años desde que tuvimos la oportunidad de otorgar mini-becas para la instrucción presencial debido a la pandemia, y estamos agradecidos de que finalmente haya llegado el momento de regresar de manera segura a las aulas para revivir la enseñanza de la escritura maya antigua.

Tenemos algunas solicitudes adicionales en proceso, y también continuamos aceptando solicitudes para más mini-becas según sea necesario, ¡así que continúe solicitando!

Estamos orgullosos de haber podido otorgar mini-becas a los siguientes dieciséis colegas mayas, quienes hablan nueve idiomas mayas diferentes tanto en Guatemala como en México. Aquí están, en el orden en que fueron otorgados:

Ajpub’ Pablo García Ixmatá
Chicacao, Suchitepéquez, Guatemala: Tzutujil

Crisanto Kumul
Sisbichen, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Edy Benjamín López Castillo
Jacaltenango, Huehuetenango, Guatemala: Popti’

Gloria Nayeli Tun Tuz
Dzitox, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Gregorio Hau Caamal
Sinanche, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Julio César López
Oxchuc, Chiapas, Mexico: Tzeltal

Laysha Yanara Jimenez Uicab
Margarita Maza de Juárez,
Quintana Roo, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Leonel Pacay Rax
Cobán, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala: Q’eqchi

Marta Dominga Cux Yac
Santa Lucía Utatlán, Sololá, Guatemala: K’iche’

Martin Gómez Ramirez
Abasolo, Ocosingo, Chiapas, Mexico: Tzeltal

Mateo Ajualip Rodriguez
Cubulco, Baja Verapaz, Guatemala: Achí

Milner Rolando Pacab Alcocer
Yaxcabá, Yucatan, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Omar Chan May
Felipe Carillo Puerto, Quintana Roo, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Pedro Geovi Toledo and Gaspar Pedro Nicolas
San Miguel Acatán, Huehuetenango, Guatemala: Akateko

Victor Manuel Mazun Tec
Yaxunah, Yucatán, Mexico: Yucatec Maya

Waykan Gonzalo Benito Pérez
Palin, Escuintla, Guatemala: Poqomam

¡Felicitaciones a todos estos destinatarios y gracias a todos los que hacen posible estos talleres a través de sus generosas donaciones! Estamos muy agradecidos de poder reanudar el trabajo con las comunidades mayas para ayudarlas a preservar sus idiomas y culturas, y a interesarse en la escritura de los antiguos mayas.

¡Esperamos escuchar acerca de estos próximos talleres y publicar sus informes desde el campo en un futuro cercano!

Sinceramente,

Michael Grofe, Presidente
MAM

Publicado en New

6 Ahaw 13 Sotz’: English

6 Ahaw 13 Sotz’ (June 12, 2022)

Haz clic aquí para leer en español

6 Ahaw 13 Sotz’: Drawing by Jorge Pérez de Lara.

6 Ahaw 13 Sotz’ (June 12, 2022)
2022 MAM Minigrants Are Now Available!!:

Calling for Applications!

Mam speaker Jun Kanek Nimwitz Pérez at the Fourth International Congreso in 2018.

At long last, we are excited to announce that we are once again starting up our MAM mini-grant program for 2022! It has been over two long years since we have offered funding for face-to-face workshop instruction, and with Covid restrictions now lifting, along with common-sense masking and other precautions, we feel that the time has come for us to help support face-to-face workshops, as well as continuing our support of online instruction and educational videos. For many Maya communities who have been struggling with little access to the internet, we hope this will come as a welcome relief.

Our mission at MAM has consistently been to support Maya instructors who are interested in teaching their students and communities about the ancient Maya writing system and the calendar as a way for them to take pride in their own endangered languages and cultures, as well as in the shared history of the Maya region, which they typically do not learn about in school.

From the very beginning of our work with Maya people, we see our role at MAM as supporting and funding the interests of our Maya colleagues upon invitation, rather than convincing Maya people that they should learn something that may not interest them. However, we have witnessed the profound fascination and interest that many Maya people have taken in learning the ancient script, and how meaningful this has been in their lives and in their work to preserve their languages and cultures. We are happy to provide resources and help to those who seek it, and it is this work that we hope to continue.

It has been far too long since we have been able to provide the full support that our Maya colleagues need. The Fourth Congreso was held four years ago in 2018, and we are hoping that the Fifth Congreso will finally be able to take place next year in 2023. These mini-grants will greatly help in the preparations for this larger event.

There are approximately thirty different languages within the Mayan language family that all descended from a common linguistic ancestral language more than 3,000 years ago, with sub-families of the Mayan family sharing even more recent common ancestry. While each language and culture within the Mayan family has its own unique and complex history, all Maya cultures share similar calendars, stories, and cultural practices, as well as having faced over 500 years of European colonization and discrimination.

Based on the evidence, we now know that the Classic Maya writing system was largely used to write languages within the Ch’olan, Tzeltalan, and Yucatecan sub-families. The now extinct language of Classical Ch’olti’ was the primary scribal language, though such formal scripts like this in history have often been used by educated and elite scribes who spoke multiple different languages and dialects.

While many Mayan languages may not have commonly been written themselves, speakers of many current Mayan languages have now taken great interest in learning about the writing system since it began to be deciphered, and they have even adapted the Classic script to accommodate sounds in these different languages as they are spoken today. This process is very similar to how European speakers of many different languages looked to Classical Greece and Rome during the Renaissance, adapting the Greek and Roman alphabets to write their own languages, while also taking pride in reviving the shared ancient history on their continent and bringing about a rebirth and celebration of ancient culture—creating new and vibrant living traditions.

As has been our practice in the past, we will now once again accept applications and proposals from Maya teachers who have preferably attended previous workshops or Congresos. This coming week, we will send out a call for applications to our current mailing list of Maya colleagues. However, if you are a Maya instructor who is not on our mailing list and you would like to receive an application, please feel free to contact us at

discovermam@gmail.com.

We will be able to fund approximately 30 mini-grants with a typical budget of up to $200 US each. We ask for an itemized budget with the application, and a written report to be submitted to us within one month of the end of the workshop.

We look forward to announcing our first 2022 mini-grant recipients next month!

Chjonte, Sib’alaj Maltiyox, Yum Bo’otik,

Michael Grofe, President
MAM

6 Ahaw 13 Sotz’: Español

6 Ahaw 13 Sotz’ (12 de junio de 2022)

Click here to read in English

6 Ahaw 13 Sotz’: dibujo de Jorge Pérez de Lara.

Mam hablante Jun Kanek Nimwitz Pérez en el Cuarto Congreso Internacional en 2018.

6 Ahaw 13 Sotz’ (12 de junio de 2022)
¡¡Ya están disponibles las minibecas MAM 2022!!

Convocatoria de solicitudes

¡Por fin, nos complace anunciar que una vez más estamos iniciando nuestro programa de mini-becas MAM para 2022! Han pasado más de dos largos años desde la última vez que ofrecimos fondos para apoyar la realización de talleres presenciales. Y con el inicio del fin de las restricciones por Covid que está dándose, junto con el uso razones de mascarillas y otras precauciones, pensamos que ha llegado el momento de dar nuestro apoyo tanto a talleres presenciales, como a la instrucción en línea y la realización de videos educativos. Esperamos que esto sea un esfuerzo bienvenido entre muchas comunidades mayas con problemas de acceso a Internet.


Nuestra misión en MAM ha sido siempre apoyar a los instructores mayas interesados en enseñar a sus estudiantes y comunidades el antiguo sistema de escritura maya y el calendario como una forma de mostrar orgullo¬¬¬ de sus propios idiomas y culturas, que se encuentran en peligro de desaparecer, así como de la historia compartida de la región maya, algo que normalmente no se enseña en la escuela.

Desde el comienzo de nuestro trabajo con las comunidades mayas, consideramos que nuestro rol en MAM es apoyar y financiar los intereses de nuestros colegas mayas cuando nos lo solicitan, en lugar de intentar convencer a las comunidades de que deben aprender algo que quizás no les interese. Sin embargo, hemos sido testigos de la profunda fascinación e interés que muchas personas mayas han mostrado por aprender la escritura antigua, y de cuán significativo ha sido esto en sus vidas y en su trabajo de preservación de sus idiomas y culturas. Nos complace brindar recursos y ayuda a quienes los buscan, y es este trabajo el que esperamos continuar.

Ha pasado demasiado tiempo desde la última que estuvimos en posibilidad de brindar todo el apoyo que nuestros colegas mayas necesitan. El Cuarto Congreso se llevó a cabo hace cuatro años en 2018, y esperamos que el Quinto Congreso finalmente pueda llevarse a cabo el próximo año, en 2023. Estas mini subvenciones serán de gran ayuda en los preparativos para este evento, de mayor tamaño.

Hay aproximadamente treinta idiomas diferentes dentro de la familia de idiomas mayas, que descienden de un idioma ancestral lingüístico común hace más de 3000 años, con subfamilias de la familia maya que comparten un ancestro común aún más reciente. Si bien cada idioma y cultura dentro de la familia maya tiene su propia historia única y compleja, todas las culturas mayas comparten calendarios, historias cosmológicas y prácticas culturales similares, además de haber enfrentado más de 500 años de colonización y discriminación europea.

Con base en la evidencia, ahora sabemos que el sistema de escritura maya clásico se usó en gran medida para escribir idiomas dentro de las subfamilias ch’olana, tzeltalana y yucateca. El ch’olti clásico, una lengua que ya no se habla, era el idioma principal de los escribas, si bien en textos formales e históricos los escribas educados y de élite, capaces de hablar múltiples idiomas y diferentes dialectos, a menudo han la utilizaron.

Aunque es posible que muchos idiomas mayas no se hayan escrito comúnmente, los hablantes contemporáneos de varios idiomas mayas modernos se interesaron mucho en aprender sobre el sistema de escritura desde que comenzó a descifrarse, e incluso han adaptado la escritura clásica a los sonidos en los diferentes idiomas, tal y como se hablan en la actualidad. Este proceso es muy similar a la manera en que los hablantes europeos de muchos idiomas diferentes consideraron a la Grecia y Roma clásicas durante el Renacimiento, adaptando los alfabetos griego y romano para escribir sus propios idiomas, al tiempo que se enorgullecían de resucitar la historia antigua compartida en su continente y hacer posible un renacimiento y una celebración de la cultura antigua, creando así nuevas y vibrantes tradiciones vivas.

Como ha sido nuestra práctica en el pasado, habremos de aceptar nuevamente solicitudes y propuestas de maestros mayas que hayan asistido preferentemente a talleres o congresos anteriores. La próxima semana, enviaremos una convocatoria de solicitudes a nuestra lista de correo electrónico actual de colegas de la lengua maya. Sin embargo, si usted es un maestro maya que no está en nuestra lista de correo electrónico y le gustaría recibir una solicitud, no dude en ponerse en contacto con nosotros en

discovermam@gmail.com.

Podremos financiar aproximadamente 30 mini-becas con un presupuesto típico de hasta $200 USD cada una. Para ello, solicitamos se nos envíe un presupuesto detallado junto con la solicitud, así como un informe escrito que deberá entregársenos en el plazo de un mes a partir de la finalización del taller.

¡Esperamos poder estar anunciando a nuestros primeros beneficiarios de mini-becas de 2022 el próximo mes!

Chjonte, Sib’alaj Maltiyox, Yum Bo’otik,

Michael Grofe, President
MAM

5 Ahaw 13 Wo’: English

5 Ahaw 13 Wo’ (May 3, 2022)

Haz clic aquí para leer en español

5 Ajaw 13 Wo’: Drawing by Jorge Pérez de Lara. Jorge Pérez de Lara.

Promotional Invitation to the Úuchben Maya Ts’íib workshop

5 Ahaw 13 Wo’ (May 3, 2022)
Úuchben Maya Ts’íib:
An Online Workshop with Omar Alejandro Chan May

We have already reached the month of May as the end of the dry season finally gives way to the arrival of the rains and the season of planting in Maya lands. This month, we hear from Omar Alejandro Chan May who offered a free, weekly online workshop from February 23 to March 23 this year titled “Úuchben Maya Ts’íib”, sponsored by MAM as part of our mini-grant program for online learning initiated last year. Omar shares with us the introductory session that he recorded with his students in both Spanish and Màaya T’àan. We have added this video to our MAM YouTube channel for all who are interested in viewing it, and we thank Omar and all of the workshop participants for sharing it with us.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/8JHtIS4bhn4

We hope to provide additional online video resources from workshops like this in the future, and we likewise look forward to being able to once again offer mini-grants for face-to-face workshops as the restrictions of the pandemic finally are lifted. In addition, we hope to finally be able to set a date for the Congreso next year.

www.youtube.com/embed/8JHtIS4bhn4

Stay tuned, and may the coming months provide bountiful rain for our Maya friends, and relief for all of us from the past two years of the pandemic.

Yum Bo’otik,

Michael Grofe, President
MAM

5 Ahaw 13 Wo’: Español

5 Ahaw 13 Wo’ (3 de mayo de 2022)

Click here to read in English

5 Ahaw 13 Wo’: dibujo de Jorge Pérez de Lara.

Invitación Promocional al taller Úuchben Maya Ts’íib

5 Ahaw 13 Wo’ (3 de mayo de 2022)
Úuchben Maya Ts’íib:
Un Taller en Línea con Omar Alejandro Chan May

Ya hemos llegado al mes de mayo cuando el fin de la estación seca finalmente da paso a la llegada de las lluvias y la época de siembra en tierras mayas. Este mes, escuchamos a Omar Alejandro Chan May, quien ofreció un taller en línea semanal gratuito del 23 de febrero al 23 de marzo de este año titulado “Úuchben Maya Ts’íib”, patrocinado por MAM como parte de nuestro programa de mini-becas para el aprendizaje en línea iniciado el año pasado. Omar comparte con nosotros la sesión introductoria que grabó con sus alumnos tanto en español como en màaya t’àan. Hemos agregado este video a nuestro canal de YouTube MAM para todos los interesados en verlo, y agradecemos a Omar y a todos los participantes del taller por compartirlo con nosotros.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/8JHtIS4bhn4

Esperamos proporcionar recursos de video en línea adicionales de talleres como este en el futuro, y también esperamos ofrecer una vez más mini-becas para talleres en persona a medida que finalmente se levanten las restricciones de la pandemia. Además, esperamos poder finalmente fijar una fecha para el Congreso el próximo año..

Estén atentos y que los próximos meses traigan abundante lluvia para nuestros amigos mayas y alivio para todos nosotros de los últimos dos años de la pandemia.

Yum Bo’otik,

Michael Grofe, President
MAM

4 Ajaw 18 Kumk’u: English

4 Ajaw 18 Kumk’u (March 24, 2022)

Haz clic aquí para leer en español

4 Ajaw 18 Kumk’u: Drawing by Jorge Pérez de Lara.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Screen Shot 2022-03-24 at 4.17.19 AM.png

4 Ajaw 18 Kumk’u (March 24, 2022)
The Maya Hieroglyphic Database Online:
Revolutionizing Access and Democratizing Decipherment

Today, we find ourselves on a day 4 Ajaw in the winal of Kumk’u, echoing the familiar base date of the Long Count itself on 4 Ajaw 8 Kumk’u, several thousand years ago. Depending on the calendar correlation we use, we are also just about a week away from the date of the Classic Haab New Year on 0 Pop—a day which continuously rotates through the seasons by one day earlier every four years.

It is important to mention that the ways in which different Maya people have celebrated and commemorated the new year itself have varied at different times and places, and that the Classic Haab New Year of 0 Pop is not the same thing as the beginning of the agricultural year or cycle that I mentioned last month, which is more closely tied to the seasons and evident in several Maya groups. I had an important conversation with Hector Xol following my last blog about the evidence for the agricultural new year, and I realized that I should have explained a bit more about the variations in the ways that living Maya people recognize different new year celebrations, and how citing only non-Maya anthropologists and archaeologists can come across as arrogantly ignoring the voices of living Maya people.

Of course, as outsiders who rely on partial accounts from the ethnographic and epigraphic records, we must always be cautious to avoid asserting that there was just one “correct” way that Maya people celebrated new cycle events in different times and places. Maya people speak some 30 different languages, each with their own variations on the yearly calendar, and with differing amounts of overlap. We must also remember that there are many living Maya people who continue to keep their traditions very much alive, and they need not change them to conform to any one, reconstructed version from epigraphers or archaeologists. I find that it is from the dialogue between us that we all stand to benefit, and both Maya and non-Maya scholars have much to contribute and learn from one another in our collective exploration and understanding of the past.

Indeed, what we know of the Classic Maya Haab calendar is that it drifted throughout the year by one day every four years. With the imposition of the European calendar, the various different yearly calendars among different Maya peoples became frozen to the tropical year at specific times and places. Yet, agricultural traditions certainly persisted, and the 260-day count continued among several Maya groups, as it continues today.

While we may see slight differences in correlation when we look at astronomical evidence from the inscriptions, such as the potential eclipse reference from Santa Elena Poco Uinic, I don’t think that this conflicting information should cause anyone to abandon their traditional counts. It is not anyone’s place as an outsider to tell another how they should or shouldn’t observe their traditions. Instead, I take it as my role as an epigrapher, an archaeoastronomer, and a teacher to ask questions, look at the evidence, and to help collaborate on figuring things out, while also working with living Maya people, learning from them, and helping them to learn about and access information about the Maya past so that they, too, can contribute to the field while also maintaining and nurturing their own special connection to their own past, their own languages, and their own cultural traditions. Sometimes, I may stumble awkwardly, as we all do, but I remain committed to these goals.

In that regard, I am very happy to announce the recent release of the online Maya Hieroglyphic Database! This project stands to revolutionize and democratize decipherment by providing free access to the entire corpus of Maya inscriptions in a single, searchable database. This project was first initiated by Martha Macri and Matthew Looper at the University of California, Davis, and it has spanned four decades of work. With major contributions by Ruth Krochock, Yuriy Polyukhovych, and Gabrielle Vail, it has been a collective effort and collaboration among many contributors. For the past 21 years, I have had privileged access to the database as a research assistant, preparing images and contributing along with many others as a coder, and it was through this work that I learned to read and decipher Maya glyphs. I continue to use the database regularly in my research, and I am thrilled that it is finally available for everyone to use!

Currently housed at California State University, Chico under director Matthew Looper, the database is necessarily a work in progress, in that newly discovered inscriptions continue to be added, including unpublished inscriptions found only in museums. Likewise, the database makes collaborative decipherment much easier, while the process of decipherment is an ongoing process as errors are corrected, and new insights provide new decipherments.

The database now holds 207,539 separate grapheme entries, and 85,565 individual glyph block entries, including texts from the monumental inscriptions, the vases, and three of the surviving codices. It includes a searchable catalog of glyphs, as well as individual databases for separate searches in the Classic inscriptions and the codices, both by glyph block, and by individual grapheme.

You can access the Maya Hieroglyphic Database at the following address:

Please note that the MHD is only for desktop or laptop computers, and not yet available as a mobile application.

www.mayadatabase.org

First, you will need to log in and verify your login through your email. Be sure to look in your spam folder in case the verification email is sent there.

You can find some helpful users guides and videos that Matthew Looper has posted at the following blog:

http://mlooper.yourweb.csuchico.edu/MHD/

There are also several reference documents (Reports 71-75) you can download from Glyph Dwellers:

www.glyphdwellers.com

I will provide an introductory search guide with screenshots below.

As it stands, the database is currently only available in English, and one of the next phases of the project will be to create a Spanish-language version that will allow many Maya people more immediate access. This will be a huge undertaking, and through a potential collaboration between the MHD and MAM, we hope to contribute to the release of the Spanish-language version of the database online in the future.

If you do notice any errors or have any questions about how the database works, please feel free to reach out to Matthew Looper:

MLooper@csuchico.edu

In addition, I would be more than happy to help answer any questions you may have about how to use the database. Please feel free to reach out to me as well:

discovermam@gmail.com

May this revolutionary database be a gift to the world, and especially to the Maya people whose ancestors were the authors of these beautiful texts.

Happy Deciphering!

Michael Grofe, President
MAM

Maya Hieroglyphic Database – Introductory Search Examples

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 1.png

As a simple introduction to the database, we can begin with the a specific monument. Given that I contributed my drawing of Copan Stela A to the database, let me show you how to search for that text. On the home page, click on “Search Texts and/or Catalog” and scroll down to the bottom of the drop-down menu to click on “Classic – Graphemes”. This will give you a glyph by glyph analysis and familiarize you with the catalog codes. Alternately, choosing “Classic –Blocks” will provide reading based on entire glyph blocks.

In the upper left corner of the search page, click “Select”, and a search tab opens up with “objabbr” and “Contains” already selected for you. Click where it says “objabbr”, and select “objsiteorig” (object site origin) from the drop-down menu. Then where it says “Keyword” write in “Copan” and click “Add”.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 3.png

Then, go to the drop-down menu again and select “objname” (object name), and where it says “Keyword” write in “Stela A” and click “Add”.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 4.png

Go to the upper left of the search tab and click “Select”, and then the entire text of Copan Stela A will appear as text data.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 2.png

Clicking on the top line will take you to the beginning of the text, with drawings of the glyph blocks, transcription of the each of the graphemes, and grapheme codes (gr code) that can be used to search in the catalog and in the rest of the database. Scrolling down, you will see chronological information containing the Maya dates and calendrical data, all of which are searchable.

Beneath the drawing of the glyph block, a low resolution image of the monument is included.

If you click “Search Catalog” then it will bring you to a helpful catalog page for this specific glyph, including references and other examples, but note that you will lose your place within the text of Stela A and have to re-initiate the search to return to your place.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 8.png

Pages of the catalog for the glyph ZHE “tzi”

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 9.png

Resuming with the text for Copan Stela A, clicking on the right arrow at the top of the frame will take you to the next grapheme in the glyph block, and then to subsequent glyph blocks.

Noting under the category “semantic” in this first glyph block, we see “ISIG/Kumk’u”, since this is the Initial Series Introductory Glyph with the Haab patron for the winal of Kumk’u. If you now want to search for all of the examples of the ISIG throughout the inscriptions, it is easier to do this by going back to the home page and selecting “Classic – Blocks”. This way, it will not take as long to load so many individual grapheme records. Then return to the upper left corner of the search page, click “Select”, and a search tab opens up again. Click where it says “objabbr”, and select “blsem” (block semantic) on the drop-down menu. Then where it says “Keyword” write in “ISIG”, and click “Add”. Click “Select” and then all of the examples of the ISIG throughout the inscriptions will appear! Clicking on the top line will show you the ISIG from Aguateca Stela 3. Note that some have not yet been drawn, but most are included.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 10.png

Note that it will load only 50 examples at a time, but scrolling down will add on the next 50 after waiting a few seconds. It will take a minute or so to load all 618 examples of the ISIG from the entire corpus.

If you want to sort all of the examples of the ISIG by long count date, then simply go back to the upper right corner of the data page, click on “objlc” (object long count), and it will sort all of these examples chronologically by their long count dates. Voilà!

For a more specific search for only those ISIG with the patron of Kumk’u, you could include just “ISIG/Kumk’u” in the “blsem” category, or you could additionally select ISIG glyphs by site under “objsiteorig”.

The possibilities are endless, and using this powerful new tool will help users become more proficient at reading and understanding Maya writing. Furthermore, it can lead you to identify new patterns that can lead to new insights and new decipherments!

Enjoy!!

If you wish to make a tax-deductible donation in any amount to support the MHD, please use this secure link:

http://www.csuchico.edu/givetomayaglyphdatabasefund

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 11.png

4 Ajaw 18 Kumk’u: Español

4 Ajaw 18 Kumk’u (24 de marzo de 2022)

Click here to read in English

4 Ajaw 18 Kumk’u:
dibujo de Jorge Pérez de Lara.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Screen Shot 2022-03-24 at 4.17.19 AM.png

4 Ajaw 18 Kumk’u (24 de marzo de 2022)
La Base de Datos de Jeriglíficos Mayas en Línea:
Revolucionando el acceso y democratizando el desciframiento

Hoy, nos encontramos en un día 4 Ajaw en el winal de Kumk’u, haciéndose eco de la fecha base familiar de la propia Cuenta Larga en 4 Ajaw 8 Kumk’u, hace varios miles de años. Dependiendo de la correlación de calendario que usemos, también estamos a una semana de la fecha del año nuevo clásico de haab en 0 Pop, un día que rota continuamente a través de las estaciones un día antes cada cuatro años.

Es importante mencionar que las formas en que los diferentes pueblos mayas han celebrado y conmemorado el año nuevo mismo han variado en diferentes momentos y lugares, y que el año nuevo clásico haab de 0 Pop no es lo mismo que el comienzo del año agrícola o ciclo que mencioné el mes pasado, que está más ligado a las estaciones y es evidente en varios grupos mayas. Tuve una conversación importante con Héctor Xol después de mi último blog sobre la evidencia del año nuevo agrícola, y me di cuenta de que debería haber explicado un poco más sobre las variaciones en las formas en que los mayas vivos reconocen las diferentes celebraciones del año nuevo, y cómo citar solo a los antropólogos y arqueólogos extranjeros pueden dar la impresión de ignorar arrogantemente las voces de los mayas vivos.

Por supuesto, como forasteros que se basan en relatos parciales de los registros etnográficos y epigráficos, siempre debemos ser cautelosos para evitar afirmar que solo había una forma “correcta” en que los mayas celebraban los eventos del nuevos ciclos en diferentes tiempos y lugares. Los mayas hablan unos 30 idiomas diferentes, cada uno con sus propias variaciones en el calendario anual y con diferentes cantidades de superposición. También debemos recordar que hay muchas personas mayas vivas que continúan manteniendo sus tradiciones muy vivas, y no necesitan cambiarlas para ajustarse a ninguna versión reconstruida de epigrafistas o arqueólogos. Encuentro que es del diálogo entre nosotros que todos nos beneficiamos, y tanto los eruditos mayas como los no mayas tienen mucho que contribuir y aprender unos de otros en nuestra exploración y comprensión colectiva del pasado.

De hecho, lo que sabemos del calendario haab maya clásico es que cambiaba un día cada cuatro años a lo largo del año. Con la imposición del calendario europeo, los diferentes calendarios anuales entre los diferentes pueblos mayas se congelaron al año tropical en momentos y lugares específicos. Sin embargo, las tradiciones agrícolas ciertamente persistieron y la cuenta de 260 días continuó entre varios grupos mayas, como continúa hoy..

Si bien podemos ver ligeras diferencias en la correlación cuando observamos la evidencia astronómica de las inscripciones, como la posible referencia del eclipse de Santa Elena Poco Uinic, no creo que esta información contradictoria deba hacer que alguien abandone sus conteos tradicionales. No es el lugar de nadie como un extraño decirle a otro cómo deben o no deben observar sus tradiciones. En cambio, asumo mi papel como epigrafista, arqueoastrónomo y maestro para hacer preguntas, mirar la evidencia y ayudar a colaborar para resolver las cosas, al mismo tiempo que trabajo con personas mayas vivas, aprendo de ellos y ayudando que aprendan y accedan a información sobre el pasado maya para que ellos también puedan contribuir al campo mientras mantienen y nutren su propia conexión especial con su propio pasado, sus propios idiomas y sus propias tradiciones culturales. A veces, puedo tropezar torpemente, como todos lo hacemos, pero sigo comprometido con estos objetivos.

En ese sentido, ¡estoy muy feliz de anunciar el reciente lanzamiento de la Maya Hieroglyphic Database (Base de Datos de Jeroglíficos Mayas) en línea! Este proyecto pretende revolucionar y democratizar el desciframiento al proporcionar acceso gratuito a todo el corpus de inscripciones mayas en una única base de datos con capacidad de búsqueda. Este proyecto fue iniciado por primera vez por Martha Macri y Matthew Looper en la Universidad de California, Davis, y ha abarcado cuatro décadas de trabajo. Con importantes contribuciones de Ruth Krochock, Yuriy Polyukhovych y Gabrielle Vail, ha sido un esfuerzo colectivo y la colaboración entre muchos colaboradores. Durante los últimos 21 años, he tenido acceso privilegiado a la base de datos como asistente de investigación, preparando imágenes y contribuyendo junto con muchos otros como codificador, y fue a través de este trabajo que aprendí a leer y descifrar los glifos mayas. Continúo usando la base de datos con regularidad en mi investigación, ¡y estoy encantada de que finalmente esté disponible para que todos la usen!

Actualmente alojada en la Universidad Estatal de California, Chico bajo la dirección de Matthew Looper, la base de datos es necesariamente un trabajo en progreso, ya que se siguen agregando inscripciones recién descubiertas, incluidas inscripciones inéditas que se encuentran solo en museos. Del mismo modo, la base de datos facilita mucho el desciframiento colaborativo, mientras que el proceso de desciframiento es un proceso continuo a medida que se corrigen los errores y los nuevos conocimientos brindan nuevos desciframientos.

La base de datos contiene ahora 207,539 entradas de grafemas independientes y 85,565 entradas de bloques de glifos individuales, incluidos los textos de las inscripciones monumentales, los jarrones y tres de los códices supervivientes. Incluye un catálogo de búsqueda de glifos, así como bases de datos individuales para búsquedas separadas en las inscripciones clásicas y los códices, tanto por bloque de glifo como por grafema individual.

Puede acceder a la base de datos de jeroglíficos mayas en la siguiente dirección:

Tenga en cuenta que el MHD es solo para computadoras de escritorio o portátiles, y aún no está disponible como una aplicación móvil.

www.mayadatabase.org

Primero, deberá iniciar sesión y verificar su inicio de sesión a través de su correo electrónico. Asegúrese de buscar en su carpeta de correo no deseado en caso de que el correo electrónico de verificación se envíe allí.

Puede encontrar algunas guías de usuario y videos útiles que Matthew Looper ha publicado en el siguiente blog::

http://mlooper.yourweb.csuchico.edu/MHD/

También hay varios documentos de referencia (Informes 71-75) que puede descargar de Glyph Dwellers:here are also several reference documents (Reports 71-75) you can download from Glyph Dwellers:

www.glyphdwellers.com

Proporcionaré una guía de búsqueda introductoria con capturas de pantalla a continuación.

Tal como está, la base de datos actualmente solo está disponible en inglés, y una de las próximas fases del proyecto será crear una versión en español que permitirá a muchas personas mayas un acceso más inmediato. Esta será una gran tarea y, a través de una posible colaboración entre la el MHD y el MAM, esperamos contribuir al lanzamiento de la versión en español de la base de datos en línea en el futuro.

Si nota algún error o tiene alguna pregunta sobre cómo funciona la base de datos, no dude en comunicarse con Matthew Looper: MLooper@csuchico.eduou do notice any errors or have any questions about how the database works, please feel free to reach out to Matthew Looper:

MLooper@csuchico.edu

Además, estaría más que feliz de ayudar a responder cualquier pregunta que pueda tener sobre cómo usar la base de datos. Por favor, siéntase libre de comunicarse conmigo también:

discovermam@gmail.com

Que esta revolucionaria base de datos sea un regalo para el mundo, y en especial para el pueblo maya cuyos antepasados fueron los autores de estos hermosos textos.

¡Feliz Desciframiento!

Michael Grofe, President
MAM

Maya Hieroglyphic Database – Introductory Search Examples

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 1.png

Como una simple introducción a la base de datos, podemos comenzar con un monumento específico. Dado que contribuí con mi dibujo de la estela A de Copán a la base de datos, déjame mostrarte cómo buscar ese texto. En la página de inicio, haga clic en “Search Texts and/or Catalog” y desplácese hacia abajo hasta la parte inferior del menú desplegable para hacer clic en “Classic – Graphemes”. Esto le dará un análisis glifo por glifo y lo familiarizará con los códigos del catálogo. Alternativamente, elegir “Classic – Blocks” proporcionará una lectura basada en bloques de glifos completos.

En la esquina superior izquierda de la página de búsqueda, haga clic en “Select”, y se abrirá una ventana de búsqueda con “objabbr” y “Contains” ya seleccionados para usted. Haga clic donde dice “objabbr” y seleccione “objsiteorig” (origen del sitio del objeto) en el menú desplegable. Luego, donde dice “Keyword”, escriba “Copan” y haga clic en “Add”.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 3.png

Luego, vaya al menú desplegable nuevamente y seleccione “objname” (nombre del objeto), y donde dice “Keyword”, escriba “Stela A” y haga clic en “Add”.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 4.png

Vaya a la esquina superior izquierda de la ventana de búsqueda y haga clic en “Select”, y luego aparecerá el texto completo de la Estela A de Copán como datos de texto.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 2.png

l hacer clic en la línea superior, se accede al inicio del texto, con dibujos de los bloques de glifos, transcripción de cada uno de los grafemas y códigos de grafemas (código gr) que se pueden utilizar para buscar en el catálogo y en el resto de la base de datos. Al desplazarse hacia abajo, verá información cronológica que contiene las fechas mayas y los datos del calendario, todos los cuales se pueden buscar.

Beneath the drawing of the glyph block, a low resolution image of the monument is included.

Si hace clic en “Search Catalog”, lo llevará a una página de catálogo útil para este glifo específico, que incluye referencias y otros ejemplos, pero tenga en cuenta que perderá su lugar dentro del texto de la Estela A y tendrá que reiniciar la búsqueda. para volver a tu lugar.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 8.png
3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 9.png

Páginas del catálogo para el glifo ZHE ‘tzi’.

Reanudando con el texto de la Estela A de Copán, al hacer clic en la flecha derecha en la parte superior del marco, se lo llevará al siguiente grafema en el bloque de glifos y luego a los bloques de glifos subsiguientes.

Notando bajo la categoría “semantic” en este primer bloque de glifos, vemos “ISIG/Kumk’u”, ya que este es el Glifo Introductorio de la Serie Inicial con el patrón del haab para el winal de Kumk’u. Si ahora desea buscar todos los ejemplos del ISIG en las inscripciones, es más fácil hacerlo volviendo a la página de inicio y seleccionando “Classic – Blocks”. De esta forma, no tardará tanto en cargar tantos registros de grafemas individuales. Luego regrese a la esquina superior izquierda de la página de búsqueda, haga clic en “Select” y se abrirá nuevamente una ventana de búsqueda. Haga clic donde dice “objabbr” y seleccione “blsem” (bloque semántico) en el menú desplegable. Luego, donde dice “Keyword”, escriba “ISIG” y haga clic en “Add”. Haga clic en “Select” y luego aparecerán todos los ejemplos del ISIG a lo largo de las inscripciones. Al hacer clic en la línea superior, se le mostrará el ISIG de la Estela 3 de Aguateca. Tenga en cuenta que algunos aún no se han dibujado, pero la mayoría están incluidos.

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 10.png

Tenga en cuenta que cargará solo 50 ejemplos a la vez, pero si se desplaza hacia abajo, agregará los 50 siguientes después de esperar unos segundos. Tomará un minuto más o menos para cargar los 618 ejemplos de la ISIG de todo el corpus.

Si desea ordenar todos los ejemplos del ISIG mediante la fecha de la cuenta larga, simplemente vuelva a la esquina superior derecha de la página de datos, haga clic en “objlc” (Objeto cuenta larga), y esto ordenará todos estos ejemplos Cronológicamente por sus largas fechas. ¡Voilà!

Para una búsqueda más específica para solo aquellos isig con el patrón de Kumk’u, podría incluir “ISIG/Kumk’u” en la categoría “blsem”, o también podría seleccionar los glifos de ISIG en el sitio en “objsiteorig”

Las posibilidades son infinitas, y el uso de esta poderosa nueva herramienta ayudará a los usuarios a ser más competentes en la lectura y la comprensión de la escritura maya. Además, ¡puede llevarlo a identificar nuevos patrones que puedan llevar a nuevos ideas y nuevos descifraciones!

¡¡Disfrutar!!

Si desea hacer una donación deducible de impuestos en cualquier cantidad para apoyar el MHD, utilice este enlace seguro:

http://www.csuchico.edu/givetomayaglyphdatabasefund

3:Users:michaelgrofe:Desktop:Figure 11.png